Lower stakes, less scary

Halloween seems like a fitting time to discuss library research anxiety.  Though I’ll spare you an extensive literature review, I shall share a most interesting article on the subject. Stewart-Mailhiot (2014) applies the idea of low-stakes writing assignments to library research.  She notes that, as with high-stakes writing, high-stakes research assignments can contribute to anxiety.  Read More…

Thoughts for American Archives Month

Image from the Society of American Archivists As many of you know, I am helping maintain the Franco-American Collection, while we search for a new Coordinator.  I couldn’t let American Archives Month go by without some thoughts on the experience. Though this is my third time helping out between Coordinators, I continue to be amazed Read More…

Naming our strengths

Image from freeimages.co.uk Recently I had the privilege of attending a Faculty Commons presentation  on StrengthsFinder.  For those unfamiliar with it, StrengthsFinder comes out of positive psychology.  Those taking the assessment get a report on their dominant talent themes  from among  the 34 it contains (Spross, Jenkins, & Parker, 2014) .  What does StrengthsFinder have Read More…

Citing the series

Image from freeimages.co.uk A few weeks ago I shared my anime adventure with Rose of Versailles.  Since the show (Dezaki et al., 2013) had numerous credits, I adapted standard APA reference format to cite it.  This practice brought home two points about citations. First of all real-life sources are often messier than are the examples Read More…

Breaking more rules

Yvonne Mery and Andrew See (2014) listed ten rules for creating tutorials: State your learning outcomes Address different learning styles Use images Use both audio and text Treat your tutorial as a whole class Give step-by-step instructions Use an academic tone Use knowledge checks Use menu navigation Set time constraints Then they discussed when to Read More…