Banned Books Week 2018

Banned Books Week (September 23-29) is here again.  This year’s slogan, Banning Books Silences Stories, resonates well with information literacy. We have the Authority is Constructed and Contextual frame (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2016), for example.  Who is challenging books, and in what settings do they do so?  Who has the authority to Read More…

Banned Books Week 2017

For Banned Books Week 2017 (September 24-30) I read The Librarian of Basra, which was included in a 2015-2016 list of challenged books (Doyle, 2016, p. 8).  This true story depicts efforts to safeguard books in a war-torn area (Winter, 2005). At the same time USM’s Lewiston-Auburn College had a photo exhibit on American women rebuilding Read More…

Banned Books Week 2015

  Each year I post about Banned Books Week.  I do so because information literacy addresses the social issues around information (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2015).  Banned Books Week 2015(September 27-October 3) will focus on young adult books. Paint Me Like I Am: Teen Poems (WritersCorps, 2003) was challenged twice in one period.  Read More…

Citing the series

Image from freeimages.co.uk A few weeks ago I shared my anime adventure with Rose of Versailles.  Since the show (Dezaki et al., 2013) had numerous credits, I adapted standard APA reference format to cite it.  This practice brought home two points about citations. First of all real-life sources are often messier than are the examples Read More…

Banned book information

Image courtesy of the American Library Association. October 1 marks the end of Banned Books Week.  Do you have some favorite banned books?   Though I have many favorite books, I often use dictionaries, and The Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary was in Robert P. Doyle’s  Books Challenged or Banned in 2009-2010, a list compiled from reports in Read More…