Informed video creation

Since instructional videos are a mainstay of online courses, I’m working on one.  The process has raised some important questions: What are my desired outcomes? Is video the best way to address them? Are there already videos addressing them? Does my particular concept suit the subject matter? Can I meet accessibility standards? The accessibility question Read More…

More on slow media and info lit

After last month’s NELIG conference I wanted to learn more about slow media.  The Slow Media Manifesto (Köhler, David, & Blumtritt, 2010 ) lists many aspects of slow media.   Three items speak especially well to information literacy: Köhler et al (2010, Item 5) note how slow media encourage people to be “prosumers,” thoughtful and active media Read More…

Fandom and Info lit

Alexandra Samuel (2018) poses three questions about online fandom.  While the questions defy simple answers, some fan practices model information literacy. For example fans can often expound on a question of interest with evidence from the book, movie, or show.  In research don’t we identify a problem of interest to our communities (Association of College Read More…

Personal archiving and info lit

The District of Columbia Public Library has a Memory Lab, where people can save outdated media into newer formats and organize the files (Hazlett, 2018).  The ACRL Framework mentions the knowledge practice of organizing information “in meaningful ways” (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2016, Research as Inquiry section). The emphasis above is mine and Read More…

The Sixth Annual Savvies

Roll out the red carpet and set out the snacks!   Once more the InfoSavvy Movie Awards honor information literacy in film.  Credits come from the IMDB.   This year’s Savvies go to: For overall film A Mighty Wind (2003): Dir. Christopher Guest; Written by Christopher Guest & Eugene Levy; Starring Christopher Guest, Eugene Levy, Michael McKean, Read More…

The Heart of Attribution

My recent posts have images from two stock photo sites: Pexels and Unsplash.  Since these sites require no attribution, we have few rules for crediting the images we use from them.  Then we think about why we attribute images. First of all we want to give the photographer credit.  Secondly we want to help our Read More…

Fake News and transparency

I’m recommending a webinar recording about fake news. This presentation distinguishes itself from some others on the subject in a few important ways. Firstly presenter Dr. Adam Blackwell (ProQuest) makes an effort to define fake news. Allcott & Gentzkow (2017) describe producers of fake news as valuing neither accuracy nor their long-term reputation. Blackwell uses Read More…

Podcasts and the Information Landscape

While I was watching a favorite Masterpiece! series, I learned about the Masterpiece Studio podcast.  Then I learned about the Circulating Ideas podcast through one of my professional lists.  What do the experiences say about information literacy? I learned about my chosen podcasts in context, in my recreational setting and my work setting respectively.  Information is Read More…

Media you can use

With the recent heat I couldn’t resist using a snowman image.  I also use it to make a point about information use. Once I saw a flyer with the image of Olaf, the snowman from Disney’s Frozen.Disney generally protects its copyright.  Stanford University’s Fair Use Project even spliced together Disney footage to make a point about Read More…