Making and information

    June 17-23 marked the National Week of Making.  You may have heard about makerspaces, often in libraries, where people can create things: See, for example, Scott’s blog post (2016).  Though projects differ, they involve information. Making doesn’t happen in a vacuum.  Makers use information about techniques or equipment.  If they are creating something Read More…

The Fourth Annual Savvies

Welcome to the fourth annual InfoSavvy Movie Awards!  As usual the credits come from IMDB.  Let’s get right to this year’s winners. For outstanding movie: The Social Network (2010): Dir. David Fincher; Written by Aaron Sorkin (screenplay) & Ben Mezrich (book); Starring  Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Justin Timberlake. Information literacy concerns the whole information ecosystem, Read More…

Blogs and scholarly conversation

Image by Lisa Risager from Denmark (WordPress 10th anniversary  Uploaded by palnatoke) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons As a blogger I follow some favorite blogs.  A recent post in one of them highlighted research as a conversation. LaGuardia (2015) summarized the first two phases of a Project Information Literacy study.  Phase 1 interviews Read More…

Leaping through the information cycle

The information cycle covers information creation and use over time.  A TV series can serve as a case in point. When Quantum Leap first aired, people saw the commercials (for ex. mattind69v3, 1989/2013) and read the reviews (for ex. Haithman, 1989).  Magazines covered the show during its run: Maclean’s, for instance, reported on a controversial Read More…

Questioning assumptions

 “Question mark”. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Question_mark.svg#/media/File:Question_mark.svg In a blog post Barbara Fister (2014) reports on the Adobe Digital Editions privacy fiasco (Hoffelder, 2014).  As eye-opening as the revelations are, the post also impresses me in its questioning of assumptions. Fister (2014) refuses to assume that library users don’t care about Read More…

The art of the webinar

Image from freeimages.co.uk As an increasingly common means of sharing information the webinar deserves some attention.  My experience as a participant has attuned me to what the better webinars do well.  These best practices include: Keeping the webinar brief We’re busy people.  The best webinars get to the point and don’t try to cover everything. Read More…

Wikipedia for justice

By Nerun (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons I have written before about the wise use of Wikipedia.  Booth (2014) highlights assignments where students create well-researched Wikipedia entries or edit existing ones.  These assignments serve a twofold purpose. First of all students get experience writing for audiences other than the instructor.  This Read More…

The Third Annual Savvies

Break out the beverages and snacks! It’s time for the third annual InfoSavvy Movie Awards, my quirky answer to the Oscars.  As usual the credits come from the Internet Movie Database.  This year’s Savvies go to: For Overall Film The Hoax (2006): Dir. Lasse Hallström; Written by William Wheeler (screenplay) & Clifford Irving (book); Starring Read More…

The album and the journal

Image from freeimages.co.uk With the upcoming Grammy Awards I’ll indulge in recording industry metaphors for the next couple of weeks.  Online music stores (iTunes, Amazon, etc.) let you download–after you’ve purchased it–an individual song or an entire album.  Likewise a library database lets you view (if we’ve purchased the subscription) an individual article or the Read More…