Keynote speeches and Info lit

Will you be attending conferences in the near future?  If so you will probably listen to keynote addresses.  My favorite keynotes had a few things in common. First of all the speeches were relatively brief.  This concern is important at national conferences, where people either have just arrived (for an opening keynote) or have planes Read More…

Exploring Web of Science and the scholarly conversation

Recently we librarians explored some features in Web of Science.  These features can help us map out scholarly conversations.  Since the database–despite its name–covers topics outside of science, I’ll search for “leadership development.” The Analyze Results feature allows us to spot patterns.  When, for example, were most of the results published?    In my case Read More…

Framing our info lit conversations

In December I started the 23 Framework Things challenge.  At press time I’ve completed nearly half of them.  Overall the experience is reminding me of the many places where we can talk about information literacy. I’ve been thinking of potential collaborators and initiatives.  An example of the latter would be the National Survey of Student Read More…

Managing emails, managing information

Did you make New Year’s resolutions?  If so, was one of them to be more organized?  Here are some resources for organizing your emails: http://www.43folders.com/izero http://content.reviveyourinbox.com/04-how-to-organize-your-email-inbox.html https://www.fastcompany.com/3067012/the-only-five-email-folders-your-inbox-will-ever-need The ACRL’s Research as Inquiry frame lists “organizing information in meaningful ways (emphasis mine)” as a knowledge practice (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2016).  While one–or any–of Read More…

Top Ten of 2017, Part Two

Pickard, E. (2017). From barrier to bridge: Partnering with teaching faculty to facilitate a multi-term information literacy research project.  Collaborative Librarianship, 9(3), 175-182. Pickard has collaborated with a faculty member to research information literacy instruction in online classes. Though she and her partner have tweaked the instruction each semester, the article concerns the partnership itself. Read More…

Top Ten of 2017, Part One

Where has the year gone?!  Already it’s time for my top ten articles of 2017.  In alphabetical order (by first author’s name) here are the first five: Deitering, A., & Rempel, H. G. (2017). Sparking curiosity–Librarians’ role in encouraging exploration.  In the Library With the Lead Pipe. Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2017/sparking-curiosity/ The authors discuss different types of Read More…

Fake News and transparency

I’m recommending a webinar recording about fake news. This presentation distinguishes itself from some others on the subject in a few important ways. Firstly presenter Dr. Adam Blackwell (ProQuest) makes an effort to define fake news. Allcott & Gentzkow (2017) describe producers of fake news as valuing neither accuracy nor their long-term reputation. Blackwell uses Read More…

Maine Academic Libraries Day 2017

June 15 brought us this year’s Maine Academic Libraries Day.  Margarita Noriega’s keynote speech highlighted some useful resources and drew thoughtful questions from the audience. Nancy Lewis, Amber Gray, Grace Liu, and Jen Bonnet (University of Maine) showcased four initiatives at the Fogler Library : a student book club, a faculty “Books in my Life” Read More…

Keep asking questions

  Commencement speeches often remind us to keep learning.  While I admire the sentiment, how do we keep it from becoming a cliché?  I found one possible answer in a book about questions. Make just one change outlines a system for students to develop their own questions.  It uses varied case studies to illustrate the Read More…

Summer productivity preview

  Are you already thinking about your summer academic projects?  The Chronicle of Higher Education has a helpful article on summer research productivity (“How to,” 2017).  The Chronicle compiled tips from faculty at various institutions.  After all our colleagues can be valuable sources of information.  The ACRL Framework notes the “increasingly social nature of the Read More…