Social Science Librarians’ Boot Camp 2018

  The eighth annual Social Science Librarians’ Boot Camp took place on June 1.  Dr. Claire Wardle (Harvard Kennedy School) talked about First Draft,  which fights misinformation by conducting research, training journalists, and more.  Eric Huntley (MIT) talked about data visualization, especially around climate change data.  Both speakers mentioned the importance of local context–either fostering Read More…

University College Faculty Institute 2018

Another week brought another conference, the University College  Faculty Institute.  This year’s theme, Access+Success, came through in each session. Early bird presenters Sarah Lucchesi (University of Southern Maine) and Stacey Brownlie (Off-campus Library Services) explored–with audience participation–what adult students need for research success.  In her keynote Rena Palloff, PhD spoke of how learning communities contribute to Read More…

Association of College and Research Libraries Roadshow

On May 11  ACRL’s  Roadshow came to town.   Anali Perry (Arizona State University) and Rachael Samberg (UC Berkeley) helped us participants unpack the seemingly obvious idea of scholarly communication. We considered the different stakeholders involved in the process.  To think of the scholars we most often serve, we developed personae representing them.  Since I couldn’t Read More…

Keynote speeches and Info lit

Will you be attending conferences in the near future?  If so you will probably listen to keynote addresses.  My favorite keynotes had a few things in common. First of all the speeches were relatively brief.  This concern is important at national conferences, where people either have just arrived (for an opening keynote) or have planes Read More…

Exploring Web of Science and the scholarly conversation

Recently we librarians explored some features in Web of Science.  These features can help us map out scholarly conversations.  Since the database–despite its name–covers topics outside of science, I’ll search for “leadership development.” The Analyze Results feature allows us to spot patterns.  When, for example, were most of the results published?    In my case Read More…

Framing our info lit conversations

In December I started the 23 Framework Things challenge.  At press time I’ve completed nearly half of them.  Overall the experience is reminding me of the many places where we can talk about information literacy. I’ve been thinking of potential collaborators and initiatives.  An example of the latter would be the National Survey of Student Read More…

Managing emails, managing information

Did you make New Year’s resolutions?  If so, was one of them to be more organized?  Here are some resources for organizing your emails: http://www.43folders.com/izero http://content.reviveyourinbox.com/04-how-to-organize-your-email-inbox.html https://www.fastcompany.com/3067012/the-only-five-email-folders-your-inbox-will-ever-need The ACRL’s Research as Inquiry frame lists “organizing information in meaningful ways (emphasis mine)” as a knowledge practice (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2016).  While one–or any–of Read More…

Top Ten of 2017, Part Two

Pickard, E. (2017). From barrier to bridge: Partnering with teaching faculty to facilitate a multi-term information literacy research project.  Collaborative Librarianship, 9(3), 175-182. Pickard has collaborated with a faculty member to research information literacy instruction in online classes. Though she and her partner have tweaked the instruction each semester, the article concerns the partnership itself. Read More…

Top Ten of 2017, Part One

Where has the year gone?!  Already it’s time for my top ten articles of 2017.  In alphabetical order (by first author’s name) here are the first five: Deitering, A., & Rempel, H. G. (2017). Sparking curiosity–Librarians’ role in encouraging exploration.  In the Library With the Lead Pipe. Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2017/sparking-curiosity/ The authors discuss different types of Read More…