Banned Books Week 2020

For Banned Books Week (September 27-October 3) Mount Prospect Public Library (IL) hosted an event featuring City Lit Theater.  The event, Books on the Chopping Block, showcased readings from the Ten Most Challenged Books of 2019. Each reading suited the given text.  For example the reading from Raina Telgemeier’s graphic novel Drama focused on the Read More…

Welcome Back Fall 2020

Welcome back! This post comes later in the semester than have the usual Welcome Back posts.  Still, the libraries are here for you all semester. During the first few weeks everyone is busy with start-of-semester housekeeping.  COVID-19 and the transition to BrightSpace have made things even messier.   We can provide library instruction closer to the Read More…

Summer reading and hobby information

Last time we looked at summer reading for armchair travel.  Summer reading can enhance our home life as well. Hobby information is often shared informally, from practitioner to practitioner. The ACRL Framework (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2016, p. 13 ) includes less formal sharing, as part of the social nature of information. Some Read More…

Vicarious travel through summer reading

  If we are limiting our physical travel this summer, we can still travel though our summer reading.  Strategic searching can guide us to some great travel reads. One strategy is to search for a known author who writes about our desired destination.  For example Peter Mayle writes about Provence.  I can search for him Read More…

The Eighth Annual Savvies

We could use some distraction at this time. For distraction with information literacy content, let’s hold the long-delayed InfoSavvy Movie Awards.    The Savvies go to (in alphabetical order by title): Akeelah and the bee (2006). Dir. Doug Atchison; Written by Doug Atchison. Starring Angela Bassett, Laurence Fishburne, Keke Palmer. A middle schooler pursues her Read More…

Information Sharing in a Time of Crisis

Recent weeks have drawn my attention to how information is shared and disseminated.  Some information sharing has been of the more formal type.  Think of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, for example. Of equal interest is the less formal information sharing that goes on.  For example colleagues have been sharing morale Read More…

Valentine’s Day Cards as Information

I had planned to write a Valentine’s Day post, but inspiration struck afterward.  In episode 2 of  A Very British Romance, host Lucy Worsley visited a collection of Victorian Valentine’s Day cards. Firstly she placed these cards in the context of the era’s culture and printing industry.  Commercial cards were available to those with the Read More…

Welcome Back Spring 2020

Welcome back, everyone! I hope you enjoyed winter break.  As I was preparing this post, I was leery of repeating the same reminders that I give each semester.  Then I asked myself, “Is repetition that bad?”  The message can reach someone who didn’t hear it or need it before.  Besides, we learn–in part–through repetition. Likewise Read More…

Best of 2019, Part 2

  With so many great articles I had tough choices and a last-minute substitution.  I’ll put that item last–but not least–on the list.  Otherwise here are the remaining 2019 picks in alphabetical order:   Lateef, A., & Omotayo, F. O. (2019). Information audit as an important tool in organizational management: A review of literature. Business Read More…

Best of 2019, Part 1

Reading the professional literature is part of a librarian’s information literacy.  As usual I’m sharing my favorite professional reads from this year ending.   The first five– in alphabetical order– are: Belzowski, N., & Robison, M. (2019). Kill the one-shot: Using a collaborative rubric to liberate the librarian-instructor partnership. Journal of Library Administration, 59(3), 282-297. doi: Read More…